ART EXHIBITION

Not Suitable for Breathing, a data visualization and art installation, which visualizes Canadian COVID-19 mortality data through animation, physical objects, and sound. These projects provide viewers with an opportunity to contemplate and reflect on our experiences and those we have lost during the pandemic.

In the spring of 2021, six Canadian poets (“The Intransigents,” formerly known as “The Inconvenients”) came together to pursue a lyric response to Proximal Spaces. The writers were challenged and inspired by the virtual exhibition with its combination of art, science, and proxemics.The focus of the artworks – what inhabits and thrives in the spaces and environments where we live, work, and breathe—generated these six distinctive poems.

In the spring of 2021, six Canadian poets (“The Intransigents,” formerly known as “The Inconvenients”) came together to pursue a lyric response to Proximal Spaces. The writers were challenged and inspired by the virtual exhibition with its combination of art, science, and proxemics.The focus of the artworks – what inhabits and thrives in the spaces and environments where we live, work, and breathe—generated these six distinctive poems.

Pandemic visual diary that keeps track of the COVID-19 pandemic from multiple news media and through different visual metaphors during our current period of quarantine and social constraint. My work shows the different reactions of different countries to the face of the pandemic.  
In addition to the quantitative pandemic data such as the number of casualties, spread etc. the work explores visual strategies for qualitative angles of social and emotional affect.

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Driven by an interest in how one might performatively engage the energetic liveness of archives from polysemous perspectives Jess Dobkin’s Wetrospective takes up and takes apart the linear, and authoritative conventions of archive-making impulses. Channeling them instead toward more rhizomatic readings , she upcycles her own archive of past performances in ways that constitute her concept of “bendy-time.” The “archive” performs in this exhibition at the same time as it makes sense of an artist’s 25-plus-years of performance art work—including all its material and immaterial remains, reminders, and affective labour. 

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SHARING SILHOUETTES,
2019

Our installation will be open to the public. Anyone is free to walk in and participate. However, only two people can be in at the same time. Our project needs to be set up in a closed room, preferably with no light and should have somewhere to hang the projector. Our project is an indoor project to explore the interactions between people with people and people with media. That means it will not be affected by most external factors, can be exhibited at any time.

How does it feel to be watched? That’s the raw feeling we want you to experience. You step into our world and it’s just mirrors…Little warm lights over top each one of them, giving you an eerie feeling as soft sounds beckon you closer. You walk around this mostly dark room staring at reflections and they are all that you see… It makes you feel very isolated as you notice there’s a blinking light that intrigues you to investigate it, so you start walking towards it. You eventually get to the back and you notice yourself on several large CRT monitors, your face all mangled and distorted. You realize someone has been recording you, makes you wonder who is watching? And what do they want to do to you…

OTHER ART WORK

Personal photography

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